Category: Book Reviews

The humor ‘The Bus on Thursday’ was going to prove divisive (as exhibited from the one-star Goodreads review criticising Eleanor for being a poor example for a teacher), however if you aren’t overly offended by the likes of Ottessa Moshfegh, then you can most likely deal with this one also. In general,’The Bus on Thursday’ is a little bit of a Marmite publication which I found strangely endearing in a very messed up manner. Eleanor tells her story through a set of brief blog articles in a chatty voice, being far more frank about the realities of cancer diagnosis and therapy and the effect it’s had on her psychological health than a lot of the very”honest” cancer sites. She struggles to find her place in the world after recovering from a severe illness and it is unsurprising that coming as an outsider within an isolated community does not especially help with this.  She begins an affair with an older brother of one of her pupils which finally leads her to learn more about what happened to Miss Barker. There are a few movies lately like’Discover’ and’Midsommar’ that are categorized as terror but also have some rather powerful comedic elements. It is quite rare to discover this form of genre in books, and even more difficult to do it nicely, but I believe’The Bus on Thursday’ succeeds in letting the humor to boost the genuinely unsettling happenings from the narrative and the silent feeling of something being not quite perfect.  The book starts with much more humour and less terror while the last few chapters are less humorous and more bizarre and hallucinatory. The end is open-ended rather than completely clear with a great deal of unresolved questions, together with the irregular tone maybe representing Eleanor’s precarious frame of mind. The Bus on Thursday from Shirley Barrett

‘The Bus on Thursday’ by Shirley Barrett will appeal to people who have a specific sense of humor, probably a dark one. It opens with Eleanor Mellett detecting she has …

Gotta Get Theroux This by way of Louis Theroux

‘Gotta Get Theroux This: My Lifestyles and Abnormal Instances in Tv’ is Louis Theroux’s memoir reflecting on over two decades of constructing tv documentaries. His profession started in 1994 with …

{ {The Mermaids Singing by Val McDermid is the initial volume in the Scottish writer’s popular crime fiction series featuring forensic psychologist Dr Tony Hill and Detective Carol Jordan. |} Hill and Jordan’s distinct regions of expertise complement each other nicely in their first case together where four mutilated bodies are found at the Temple Fields region of this fictional town of Bradfield where many gay bars are situated. While Jordan looks at the evidence left at the scene as part of regular police procedure, Hill will make deductions based on what’s absent so as to think of a comprehensive psychological profile of the psychopath’s history, motives and actions. The chapters are interspersed with journal entries written by the murderer that enter especially grisly detail in which medieval torture devices are involved. First released in 1995, a few of this conversation could be considered quite clichéd to get a detective book nowadays, but it is a compelling introduction to one of the most enduring crime fiction series in recent decades. Matters In Jars by Jess Kidd is the Irish writer’s first foray into historical fiction series in the 1860s and tells the story of Bridie Devine, a female detective investigating the disappearance of Christabel Berwick, the young daughter of Sir Edmund Athelstan Berwick that has been kept secret in the entire world. It later transpires that Christabel’s kidnapping might be connected to the discovery of two figures close to the crypt of Highgate Chapel. You will find dream elements to the narrative too along with the diverse cast of characters includes the ghost of a champion boxer, Ruby Doyle, along with a seven-foot-tall housemaid, Cora Butter. The sights and scents of Victorian London are described, especially the gruesome detail of Bridie’s youth where she became an apprentice to a physician, and it makes for a cross involving the raucous circus antics of Angela Carter’s fiction and the gothic elements of The Essex Serpent from Sarah Perry — Bridie’s fierce freedom is reminiscent of Perry’s unorthodox principal heroine. I’m now eager to see Kidd’s past two novels’Himself’ and’The Hoarder’ which have more modern configurations and have been both well received. Three Novels I Have Read Lately About Offense

I’ve been going through a miniature crime stage in my studying across different genres lately, namely non-fiction, crime fiction and comic books. Here are 3 books I’ve appreciated over the …